# Survival analysis

# Random Forest Survival Analysis with randomForestSRC

Just as the random forest algorithm may be applied to regression and classification tasks, it can also be extended to survival analysis.

In the example below a survival model is fit and used for prediction, scoring, and performance analysis using the package randomForestSRC from CRAN.

require(randomForestSRC)

set.seed(130948) #Other seeds give similar comparative results
x1   <- runif(1000)
y    <- rnorm(1000, mean = x1, sd = .3)
data <- data.frame(x1 = x1, y = y)
head(data)

         x1          y
1 0.9604353  1.3549648
2 0.3771234  0.2961592
3 0.7844242  0.6942191
4 0.9860443  1.5348900
5 0.1942237  0.4629535
6 0.7442532 -0.0672639

(modRFSRC <- rfsrc(y ~ x1, data = data, ntree=500, nodesize = 5))

                             Sample size: 1000
                     Number of trees: 500
          Minimum terminal node size: 5
       Average no. of terminal nodes: 208.258
No. of variables tried at each split: 1
              Total no. of variables: 1
                            Analysis: RF-R
                              Family: regr
                      Splitting rule: mse
                % variance explained: 32.08
                          Error rate: 0.11

x1new   <- runif(10000)
ynew    <- rnorm(10000, mean = x1new, sd = .3)
newdata <- data.frame(x1 = x1new, y = ynew)

survival.results <- predict(modRFSRC, newdata = newdata)
survival.results

  Sample size of test (predict) data: 10000
                Number of grow trees: 500
  Average no. of grow terminal nodes: 208.258
         Total no. of grow variables: 1
                            Analysis: RF-R
                              Family: regr
                % variance explained: 34.97
                 Test set error rate: 0.11

# Introduction - basic fitting and plotting of parametric survival models with the survival package

survival is the most commonly used package for survival analysis in R. Using the built-in lung dataset we can get started with Survival Analysis by fitting a regression model with the survreg() function, creating a curve with survfit(), and plotting predicted survival curves by calling the predict method for this package with new data.

In the example below we plot 2 predicted curves and vary sex between the 2 sets of new data, to visualize its effect:

require(survival)
s <- with(lung,Surv(time,status))

sWei  <- survreg(s ~ as.factor(sex)+age+ph.ecog+wt.loss+ph.karno,dist='weibull',data=lung)

fitKM <- survfit(s ~ sex,data=lung)
plot(fitKM)

lines(predict(sWei, newdata = list(sex      = 1, 
                                   age      = 1, 
                                   ph.ecog  = 1, 
                                   ph.karno = 90,
                                   wt.loss  = 2),
                                 type = "quantile",
                                 p    = seq(.01, .99, by = .01)),
                                 seq(.99, .01, by        =-.01),
                                 col = "blue")

lines(predict(sWei, newdata = list(sex      = 2, 
                                   age      = 1, 
                                   ph.ecog  = 1, 
                                   ph.karno = 90,
                                   wt.loss  = 2),
                                 type = "quantile",
                                 p    = seq(.01, .99, by = .01)),
                                 seq(.99, .01, by        =-.01),
                                 col = "red")

enter image description here

# Kaplan Meier estimates of survival curves and risk set tables with survminer

Base plot

install.packages('survminer')
source("https://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R")
biocLite("RTCGA.clinical") # data for examples
library(RTCGA.clinical)
survivalTCGA(BRCA.clinical, OV.clinical,
             extract.cols = "admin.disease_code") -> BRCAOV.survInfo
library(survival)
fit <- survfit(Surv(times, patient.vital_status) ~ admin.disease_code,
               data = BRCAOV.survInfo)
library(survminer)
ggsurvplot(fit, risk.table = TRUE)

enter image description here

More advanced

ggsurvplot(
   fit,                     # survfit object with calculated statistics.
   risk.table = TRUE,       # show risk table.
   pval = TRUE,             # show p-value of log-rank test.
   conf.int = TRUE,         # show confidence intervals for 
                            # point estimaes of survival curves.
   xlim = c(0,2000),        # present narrower X axis, but not affect
                            # survival estimates.
   break.time.by = 500,     # break X axis in time intervals by 500.
   ggtheme = theme_RTCGA(), # customize plot and risk table with a theme.
 risk.table.y.text.col = T, # colour risk table text annotations.
  risk.table.y.text = FALSE # show bars instead of names in text annotations
                            # in legend of risk table
)

enter image description here

Based on

http://r-addict.com/2016/05/23/Informative-Survival-Plots.html